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THE WORLD OF POST-COVID 19 FASHION:
WORDS TO EXPERTS

L’Amour by Jacquemus

The voices of fashion are speaking out with an effective call-to-action redesigning the fashion calendar and asking for a slowdown of the overall industry.

Words By Alessandra di Perna

20/09/2020

pastel green outfit

@josefinehj

Color Theme 

One of the hottest trends this summer brings is pastel colors and playful bold tones. While these are great on their own, when they are in a print they bring a whimsical and truly summer feeling to your look. For those who are new to prints, take the pastel approach. It is a nice happy medium between a bright neon pink, for example, and a subdued nude pink. Look for a small almost “ditsy” print that is calming and mixes well with the pastel. This makes the print appear very minimal and almost camouflage in the color. Pair it with your favorite white jeans to give yourself a great daytime look. Other popular pastels are light blue and soft mint green.

For those who love pastels, try mixing and matching these soft tones to make your look playful and bright. One great way to mix these is by finding a print that contains the pastel color and then blocking it with a solid pastel color. For example, a white skirt with a light blueprint and a lavender purple solid tee. A casual summer look that is effortless but speaks volumes. Look for prints that speak to your style and are going to make you feel at your best.

“Many people don’t know that there are also Arabs living in Israel,” Nissreen Najjar (Nazareth, 1985) tells me from across my Mac screen. The artist, who grew up in occupied historic Palestine within the State of Israel, is currently based in Paris, commuting between the French capital and Jerusalem; or so she did until the pandemic. Being an Arab Christian woman in an area mired in long-lasting religious and ethnic conflict such as her native country has immensely influenced her artistic work, using it to reflect the issues that concern her. “This part of my identity has been essential in my approach to artistic creation,” she shares. 

Nisreen is a woman with a kind face and an air of confidence, and she immediately opens up about her life. Asked about the beginning of her career, she tells me how after studying Fine Arts, she began to teach in Bethlehem and Jerusalem at universities. Art has always been a part of her life. It is a way for her to explore her identity as an individual and a member of a social and historical community, as well as an instrument to denounce the suffering of the Palestinian people. At the same time, it allows her to describe power hierarchies within Israel and across the rest of the world. “I consider myself a translator, I translate what happens in my homeland into my art. I tell the story of my family, of my people, and of my own life. That is my starting point, and with this raw material I construct a web of different interpretations from the perspective of someone who understands perfectly that reality but can also observe it from the outside,” she says.

From the start, I realize that it would be impossible to fully comprehend Nissreen’s artwork without understanding the daily reality of the Palestinian people and their recent history, so I direct my next question around this. “I always try to talk about what I know, what has been part of my own experiences and what catches my attention,” she explains. Nissreen works with video, performance, photography and sculpture. This combination of installations and different techniques provides her with multiple possibilities when it comes to communicating complex themes. “I bring my identity and myself to the ‘white cube’, breaking it down through confession. I baptize my cultural elements and turn them into subversive and obsessive materials.”

@filippa_k

@filippa_k

“Many people don’t know that there are also Arabs living in Israel,” Nissreen Najjar (Nazareth, 1985) tells me from across my Mac screen. The artist, who grew up in occupied historic Palestine within the State of Israel, is currently based in Paris, commuting between the French capital and Jerusalem; or so she did until the pandemic. Being an Arab Christian woman in an area mired in long-lasting religious and ethnic conflict such as her native country has immensely influenced her artistic work, using it to reflect the issues that concern her. “This part of my identity has been essential in my approach to artistic creation,” she shares. 

Nisreen is a woman with a kind face and an air of confidence, and she immediately opens up about her life. Asked about the beginning of her career, she tells me how after studying Fine Arts, she began to teach in Bethlehem and Jerusalem at universities. Art has always been a part of her life. It is a way for her to explore her identity as an individual and a member of a social and historical community, as well as an instrument to denounce the suffering of the Palestinian people. At the same time, it allows her to describe power hierarchies within Israel and across the rest of the world. “I consider myself a translator, I translate what happens in my homeland into my art. I tell the story of my family, of my people, and of my own life. That is my starting point, and with this raw material I construct a web of different interpretations from the perspective of someone who understands perfectly that reality but can also observe it from the outside,” she says.

From the start, I realize that it would be impossible to fully comprehend Nissreen’s artwork without understanding the daily reality of the Palestinian people and their recent history, so I direct my next question around this. “I always try to talk about what I know, what has been part of my own experiences and what catches my attention,” she explains. Nissreen works with video, performance, photography and sculpture. This combination of installations and different techniques provides her with multiple possibilities when it comes to communicating complex themes. “I bring my identity and myself to the ‘white cube’, breaking it down through confession. I baptize my cultural elements and turn them into subversive and obsessive materials.”

Power clashing 

This trend is one of the most experimental ways to make prints work for you and your wardrobe. We see in street-style and on the runway that people are effortlessly combining two, three, or even four prints that when looking at them alone couldn’t be farther away from going together. When experimenting with these trends, there are a few tips you can turn to that will make your power clashing look put-together and well thought out.

One place to start is to use proportions. Take a piece with a small print and pair it with a bolder one. The opposing prints show creativity and versatility when these two kinds of pieces are put together. Try staying within the same color tone for a look like this so you avoid looking not put together. Choose a color scheme and find some prints that fall within that range to ensure your look comes together effortlessly.

To really have fun with this, just play around with your prints and patterns and see what look really speaks to you. The most important thing to remember when power clashing is to trust your instinct. Utilizing these tips when looking at your patterns is just a starting point for you to have fun and try new looks this summer. Confidence is key when you are playing with prints. Own it and break the pattern and print rules to have some fun in your summer looks.

@emilisindlev

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Photography & Pieces by Artknit Studios

The Numbers

Navigating in an open sea at a high speed, the fashion industry was everything but ready for a harsh braking as the one it has faced at the beginning of 2020. As reported in The State of Fashion 2020’s executive survey, the crucial words are sustainability, digitization and innovation. Despite the great emphasis and stress put onto these issues, heavy efforts are needed in order to achieve effective improvements in terms of sustainability. The fashion sector’s practices, mainly in production processes, release six percent of the global gas emission and more than sixteen million tons of fabrics leftovers are burned down per year.

In order to meet its objectives, the industry must slow down. But is it really possible to implement such a change when facing a recession? Designers have started to expose themselves in the first place as the pioneers of a change that the extreme pandemic situation has fortunately sped up.

The Voices

Leading these voices, Giorgio Armani wrote an open letter to Women’s Wear Daily (WWD) where he praises a slowdown and realignment of the industry. What he puts emphasis on and accuses the most is the approach of the high-end and luxury sector which, in order to have an increase in sales, has resembled the processes of fast fashion, according to which a piece from production to “death” lives on the shelves for an average of three weeks.

Mr. Armani voices all his discomfort when he ascertains that these practices not only are damaging on an environmental level but also deteriorate the value of an actual designer piece and are not in line with Armani’s personal – subsequently distinctive sign of the brand – concept of limitless elegance.

Sassy outfit

The Numbers

Navigating in an open sea at a high speed, the fashion industry was everything but ready for a harsh braking as the one it has faced at the beginning of 2020. As reported in The State of Fashion 2020’s executive survey, the crucial words are sustainability, digitization and innovation. Despite the great emphasis and stress put onto these issues, heavy efforts are needed in order to achieve effective improvements in terms of sustainability. The fashion sector’s practices, mainly in production processes, release six percent of the global gas emission and more than sixteen million tons of fabrics leftovers are burned down per year.

In order to meet its objectives, the industry must slow down. But is it really possible to implement such a change when facing a recession? Designers have started to expose themselves in the first place as the pioneers of a change that the extreme pandemic situation has fortunately sped up.

The Voices

Leading these voices, Giorgio Armani wrote an open letter to Women’s Wear Daily (WWD) where he praises a slowdown and realignment of the industry. What he puts emphasis on and accuses the most is the approach of the high-end and luxury sector which, in order to have an increase in sales, has resembled the processes of fast fashion, according to which a piece from production to “death” lives on the shelves for an average of three weeks.

Mr. Armani voices all his discomfort when he ascertains that these practices not only are damaging on an environmental level but also deteriorate the value of an actual designer piece and are not in line with Armani’s personal – subsequently distinctive sign of the brand – concept of limitless elegance.

Photography & Pieces by Artknit Studios

Latin text, lating text, trial text, text should go below “ghhvh” Leonard Cohen said in 2011

In the Same Boat 

Some of the most popular prints that have become classics are stripes and polka-dots. We all have had a classic striped tee that goes with everything at some point. In fashion evolution, we have seen so many designers get playful with these classics by making them in all different colors and sizes. If you are new to prints, stripes and polka dots is a great place to start. One look that is unique yes sophisticated is playing with different angles and sizes of the stripes. You can take a classic striped and oversized button-down that has smaller stripes and elevate it. Pair it with a slip dress that has colorful stripes that go diagonally and maybe a bit larger. They may seem to oppose but since they are in the same print family they come together really nicely. The juxtaposition of the fine stripe and the large stripe make the look come together in a perfect way.

Polka-dots are another fun print to experiment with. Take the cheetah print, for example, a cousin to the polka dot. You can take this print from its classic brown and black tones and make it fun by choosing the print in a bold color like red or blue. For a bold approach, pair it with a piece that has a small polka-dot on it to keep the theme of the circular shape. If you want to opt for something more subtle, keep the cheetah or animal theme alive by combining it with a bag or shoe in a similar print. Even pairing these print classic’s with a pair of jeans can show that you know how to own the trend this summer.